Design Communications 2

    Electronic Notebook

 

PROJECTS

 

EDM (Project)(Team: Sean Hesse) (Senior Project Team: Robert Hesse)

Senior Project Page

 

 

E-mails

Initial Communication

RE-Initial Communication

 

 

The first step that had to be taken was to establish some form of COMMUNICATION with Robert, the engineer behind the EDM project.  This wasn’t too tough though seeing how he is my brother so we made contact via E-mail. After getting the “thumbs up” to start the project, I jumped right into the project by creating a rough model of what I thought Robert was looking for as far as the work tank was concerned. I came up with a concept model for each part and then made them into a concept assembly.

 

 

(The assembly looked roughly like this but with angle iron on the sides for the T-Bolts to clamp to. The base is supposed to be a rendering of the table on a standard Bridgeport universal milling machine. The appearance of the assembly changed because some parts of the assembly were modified causing the assembly to update.)

 

 

I later found that this design was unacceptable because it relied on the fact that the hole for the stand pipe and the middle slot of the milling machine could be aligned.  This was kind of a let down but in my down time I started the layout for the PROJECT WEB PAGE.  I decided to modify the parts and make a new design with a standard coupler in it that drained out of the side of the tank.  I decided to start out this new design by making a concept sketch. After I completed the concept sketch and showed it to Robert, I proceeded to model the device in Inventor for the next couple of class periods. Once I was finished modeling the work tank, this was my result.

 


 

 

 

 

My supplemental design utilizes a coupling that drains out of the side of the tank. This is a more efficient design than the idea of having it drain out of the bottom of the tank and through a slot in the milling table. Although it is more discrete to run a tube through the T-bolt slot, it is asking a lot of both the design and manufacturing teams to create a device that will actually align with the slot every time it is used. This could also have an effect on interchangeability to other machines whose milling tables may not be of the same dimensions. In this design, a preliminary box (tank) is welded out of standard 1/8” sheet metal. Once the box is welded together, two pieces of angle iron are to be welded on for the purpose of mounting. Both of these pieces of angle iron have slots milled in them to house the T-bolts that will mount them to the milling table. One of the pieces of angle iron (in this case the one on the right) will have a hole drilled in it that shares approximately the same center as the hole out of the drainage coupling. A hose will be run from the drainage coupling and out the hole in the side (that will be sealed with an industrial sealant or a gasket) and to a sump pump that will pump the dielectric fluid back into the tank. This is NOT a final design. As of right now, some changes may still have to be made. One such change may be that the height of the coupling is unacceptable. This is just a concept design that will be brought up to Robert for his approval or disapproval.

The fully dimensioned part drawings and models of the components in this device are as follows:

Drawings

Models

Design Guide

Angle iron

Angle iron

Design guide

Angle iron w/hole

Angle iron w/ hole

 

Drainage coupling

Drainage coupling

 

Work tank

Work tank

 

Assembly 1

Assembly 1

 

Assembly 2

Assembly 2

 

Welding assembly

T-bolt

 

 

Upon further communications, I found that I was mistaken in the design that was being requested. Instead of having the coupling as the drainage device, I was supposed to use a standpipe that drains into and through the coupling. At this point, I had a standpipe designed from my first concept and all I had to do was edit the size and shape of both the standpipe and the coupling. After altering the size and shape of these two parts, I edited their fully dimensioned and documented drawings. I then modified the components of the assemblies and their drawings.

 

Drawings

Images

Coupling

Coupling

Standpipe

Standpipe

Assembly one-2

Assembly one-2

Assembly two-2

Assembly two-2

 

 

 

This image reflects the changes that were made to the standpipe and coupling, as well as the assembly of all of the components.

 

 

 

After I finished designing the work tank, Robert approached me to ask if I would take part in the design of the EDM head assembly as well. I told him that I was more than willing to help him out with the design. He provided me with some hand-drawn mechanical drawings with roughly the dimensions and design that he had in mind. He also told me to keep in mind that the design was open for debate and modification. These were the drawings that he provided for me:

 

 

 

 

After looking over the drawings, I modeled them and then produced the part drawings. Once I got the drawings and models completed, I began to dimension. In my dimensioning I noticed a potentially hazardous design flaw. The fact that the minimum reasonable tolerance for drilling is 0.010” gave a lot of room for error on the holes for the guide rail, in the top and bottom plates. This meant that in the worst case scenario, there could be at least 0.020” difference between the hole centers. This would have posed a serious problem for the guide rail system, because the sliding plate might have faced restriction from sliding under those circumstances. The solution to this problem was to remove the counter bore from the bottom plate and leave a lot of clearance between the hole and the mating guide rail. This would make it so that the location of the top plate holes would be critical but there would be more room to miss the location of the bottom plate holes. When the device is assembled, the holes in the top plate will be used to locate the guide rail to where it needs to be tightened to the bottom plate so that the rails are vertical and parallel. After I (with a little help) noticed this design flaw and solution, I implemented design changes to fix the problem. After trouble shooting the design, these were the final models and drawings that I came up with:

Models

Drawings

Standard Components

Bottom Plate

Bottom Plate

10-32 Hex Nut

Bushing

Bushing

Washer

Guide Rail

Guide Rail

 

Lead Screw

Lead Screw

 

Sliding Plate

Sliding Plate

 

Top Plate

Top Plate

 

Head Assembly

Head Assembly

 

Stepper Motor

(Top Left Isometric View)

(No Drawing Necessary)

 

 

Stepper Motor

(Bottom Right Isometric View)

(No Drawing Necessary)

 

 

 

 

                 

 

 

AutoMower Project(Team: Sean Hesse & Tyrel Ellis)

(Senior Project Team: David Manning, Ethan Clews, & Clark Copeland)

Senior Project Page


E-mails

Initial Communication

 

 

 

The first step in this project was once again to establish some COMMUNICATION with the project team members.  After gaining the approval of the team members, Tyrel and I proceeded to make some rough concept sketches of the MOWER and the CHARGING STATION.  After the concept sketches were complete, we went in different and somewhat independent directions.  He moved on to modeling the mower while I moved on to designing the PROJECT WEB PAGE.

 

         

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ASSIGNMENTS

 

 

 

Assignment #1 (Review of MEC 1011)

 

 

Assignment number one was basically a review assignment that was loosely based upon the final project for Design Communications 1.  To meet the assignment requirements, I designed a box that consisted of multiple parts. I produced the following fully dimensioned drawings and models to meet the requirements of this assignment.

 

Drawings

Models

Standard Components

Design Guide

Top

Top

Washer

Design Guide

Body

Body

Nut

 

Custom Fasteners

Custom Fasteners

 

 

Ball Handle

Ball Handle

 

 

 

 

Assignment #2 (Redesign for Injection Molding)

 

 

In this assignment, we were asked to redesign a sheet metal case for injection molding. There were many objectives that had to be met in this assignment. One condition was that the new case had to rest on feet and fall at an equal pitch from any cases that were stacked on top of it. It had to hold an equally large rectangular prism as the original design. The top had to be held on by at least four standard screws. The assignment had to be handed in with a complete paper package and had to adhere to the basic standards of completeness and quality that are outlined in nearly every assignment we have had in the past. I created the following parts and fully dimensioned drawings to complete this assignment:

 

Drawings

Models

Top

Top

Bottom

Bottom

Assembly

Assembly

 

Screw (Standard Component)

 

 

Assignment #3/5 (Adaptivity and Weldments)

 

For assignment number three, we were asked to produce a model and fully dimensioned/toleranced drawings for an press fit assembly device. We had to use multistage documentation in this assignment and it was to be designed for casting. The specific objectives were as follows: 

1) Illustration Highlighting Adaptivity by:

a.   A) Algebraic Equation
1.           a) Model Parameters
2.           b) User Parameters
        c) Linked Parameters
3.           d) Embedded Parameters

b.   B) Projection

c.    C) Assembly Constraint

d.   D) Derived Part or Assembly

·        2) Weldment

·        3) Cast Base

·        4) Full set of working Drawings

·        5) Check Sections

·        6) Design Guide

·        7) Feedback

·        8) Paper Package

The models and drawings that I produced for assignment 3 were as follows:

Models

Drawings

Other

Base (Pre-Machining)

Base (Pre-Machining)

Washer (Standard Component)

Base (Machined)

Base (Machined)

Nut (Standard Component)

Block

Block

Design Guide (Word .doc)

Handle

Handle

Linked Parameters (Spreadsheet .xls)

Linking Rod 1

Linking Rod 1

Linking Rod 2 Embedded Parameters (Spreadsheet .xls)

Linking Rod 2

Linking Rod 2

Driven constraints (.avi file            read w/ media player)

Linking Rod 3

Linking Rod 3

 

Linking Arm

Linking Arm

 

Weld Plug

Weld Plug

 

Assembly

Assembly

 

 

 

In assignment number five, we were asked to use our assignment three files to demonstrate revision control. We were to release a revision “A” and then create another set of revised drawings. We were also asked to create a folder with the most recent revisions in it, that were still works in progress (A.E. revision CX where the C denotes the revision level and the X denotes the fact that it isn’t yet released).

 

 

Assignment #4 (Sculpted Form from Industrial Design)

In this assignment, we were to use the given AutoCAD design to create a three dimensional model of the container. We had to design the part for casting. The part was also supposed to have what is called a shadow groove that ran around the edge of the part.

 

 

Assignment #6

 

CHALLENGES

 

Challenge #1 (Review)

 

 

Challenge number one was basically a review of design communications two, assignment number one. We were given a sketch of a bearing assembly and were asked to turn in a paper package including a design guide, any sketches, and a complete set of working drawings. In all challenges, the objective is to finish as much of the project as possible in the three hours (or less) that are provided in class. These are the images and drawings of the parts that I got finished:

 

Drawings

Models

Bearing Adapter

Bearing Adapter

Flange Mount

Flange Mount

 

Bearing

 

Threaded Rod

 

Assembly

 

 

Challenge #2 (Adaptivity, Weldments, Redesign for Casting, and Multistage Documentation)

 

This challenge was an abbreviated version of assignments two and three/five. We were provided with the model and part drawings of a table and we had to modify it to fit the assignments requirements. We had to modify the design so that it is able to be cast, we had to increase the clearance of the holes, and we had to design a name plate for the table. We also had to use specified features such as rib and face draft. The challenge required that we utilize user parameters for certain features as well. At the end of the challenge, the paper package that we handed in was to include the modified design guide, the concept sketch (provided) with the appropriate clearance calculations on it, and a set of fully dimensioned working drawings. Finally, the challenge required that we use multistage documentation and derived components to show the individual manufacturing processes (A.E. the cast base and then the cast base with holes drilled in it).

These are the models and fully dimensioned drawings that I made for this challenge:

Drawings

Models

Design Guide

Base

Base (bottom view)

Design Guide

 

Base (top view)

 

Table (Assembly)

Table Assembly (top view)

 

 

Assembly (side view)

 

Plate

Plate

 

Base

Name Plate

 

Base After Casting

Base After Casting

 

Weldment Assembly

Standard Fastener

 

 

Challenge #3