Chris Morgan’s Work in Design Communications II

Spring 2005

To view the work of my classmates click here.

 

 

 

Wheelchair Project

(click the link above to be directed to the Wheel Chair Project Page)

 

On January 18th Jason Rowell and I began concept sketches for a lightweight easily collapsible wheelchair for his handicapped cousin who is quite active. The first decision that we made was to make a Body Frame for the wheelchair out of a single cylindrical tube. We decided to use a single cylindrical tube because of the strength to weight ratio. The rest of the wheelchair design has to be centered around a long cylindrical object. It didn’t make sense for both of us to work on the same component because theoretically we could accomplish much more working separately. I chose to begin working on the Wheel Frame.

 

The requirements for the wheel frame were simple:

1)      Needs to collapse to minimize encompassed area.

2)      Must include a shock for smoother ride.

3)      Wheels must have a “quick-release” mechanism.

 

The following is the initial concept sketch for the Wheel Frame. I also included some sketches that helped me work out some problems with dimensions and the joint that attaches the Wheel Frame to the Body Frame.

 

 

The trouble that I ran into after completing the Wheel Frame concept sketch and after deciding to use a ball and socket was that I could not visualize the complete 3-dimensional movement of the ball and socket nor could I use a formula to calculate the movement. I decided that the best way to determine the movement of the ball and socket was to model the entire Wheel Frame. I began working on the model on January 30th, 2004 and completed the model on February 1st.

 

 

On February 2nd I took some pictures of the Wheel Frame model so that I could reference my model without having to carry it around with me. Here are some of the more useful pictures that I took.

 

 

 

Three Gantry System Project

(click the link above to be directed to the Three Gantry System Project Page)

 

All Two-Year students in the Mechanical Engineering Program must take the Mechanical Project Class before graduating. This semester I’m taking that course. I was given the opportunity to choose two partners to work with on this semester long project. My two partners are Ralph Church and Erik Johnson; neither of which is taking Design Communications II. I need to design certain aspects of our Mechanical Project, but I also need to work on a project for Design Communications II. This has placed me in a unique situation where I could kill two birds with one stone. I decided to design the required parts for my Mechanical Project in my Design Communications II class so that I could receive credit in both classes for the same work. It’s more of a time saving technique than an effort at slacking off.

 

To make things easier for the reader I will briefly explain what my Mechanical Project is. For my Mechanical Project I’m linking three gantries together in series. A gantry is a mechanical system that’s capable of moving on an X, Y, and Z axis. Linking three of them together would simulate a real life manufacturing line. Aside from the boards that each gantry is mounted to the gantries will be linked together by a train. The train will run from one gantry to another unloading and loading cargo at each one. For a better understanding of how the Gantry System will be set-up click on the links below to see. The Three Gantry System Model and Drawing are only partly assembled because some of the parts required to complete the assembly were constructed by one of my teammates. Unfortunately, I was only able to get a model of the Electrical Box.

 

Assembled Gantry

Concept Sketch

Model

Drawing

Power Point Picture

 

The first step was to design the boards so that we’ll know what the area we’ll be working with will be. After making some basic calculations taking into account portability, train and track size, the size of the electrical box and desired gantry size I was able to design and fully dimension the three boards for the three gantries. The material I chose to work with was Swedish Plywood because of it’s strength to weight ratio, workability and its appearance. Below are links to the Models and Drawings for each Board.

 

Station One Board

Model

Drawing

Station Two Board

Model

Drawing

Station Three Board

Model

Drawing

 

Once the design for the three boards had been completed I was able to determine where the holes in the angle iron brackets should go. Angle iron is a stock material that only needs to be cut to length and then the holes can be drilled into the proper places. As simple as this process sounds it’s still a crucial part of the project. If the holes are off at all it could cause the entire system to bind. Below are links to the Model and the fully dimensioned Drawing.

 

Angle Iron

Model

Drawing

 

The next step was to design the side plates. The side plates are also made from stock material and the hole placement is just as important as it is with the angle iron bracket, however the hole placement is significantly more difficult with the side plates. If any of the holes are off then none of the gantries would properly function. Misalignment would cause the gantries carriage to bind and lock. Below are the links to both the Front Plate and the Back Plate.

 

Front Plate

Model

Drawing

Back Plate

Model

Drawing

 

Since the Gantries are unloading and loading cargo we had to design some type of Staging Blocks for the unloaded cargo to be placed and for the cargo waiting to be loaded to rest. The two main considerations when designing the Staging Blocks were the encompassed area and the type of material since we’d be unloading and loading with an electromagnet. Like the three Boards I chose to use Swedish Plywood to avoid any problems with the electromagnet. Below are links to the Assembled Staging Block and its components.

 

Assembled Staging Block

Model

Drawing

Staging Block Upper

Model

Drawing

Staging Block Lower

Model

Drawing

 

The next part of the project that I worked on was designing something that the X and Y-Axis motors could mount to. The X-Axis also required two rods to connect the Front and Back Plates so that a carriage could travel back and forth in the X-direction. The Y-Axis also required a second mount so that two rods could be inserted in between the mounts so that the carriage could also move in the Y-direction. Further, I also had to design “stops” for the X, Y and Z Axis so that the carriage doesn’t move too far and also for helping to “zero out” the carriage location in all three axis. Below are the Models and Drawings for all the above mentioned parts.

 

X-Axis Motor Mount

Model

Drawing

X-Axis Motor Mount’s Mount

Model

Drawing

X-Axis Stop

Model

Drawing

X-Axis Rod

Model

Drawing

Y-Axis Motor Mount

Model

Drawing

Y-Axis Mount

Model

Drawing

Y-Axis Stop

Model

Drawing

Assembled Y-Axis Stop

Model

Drawing

Y-Axis Rod

Model

Drawing

Z-Axis Stop

Model

Drawing

 

The next part that I had to design is very small, but one of the most important parts of entire Three Gantry System. This part is what I call the Carriage Mover. This tiny cylinder with a threaded thru hole is placed in Slider Blocks (the Slider Blocks have been design by one of my teammates) and a ¼-20 threaded rod is run through the threaded hole. When a stepper motor rotates that threaded rod the Carriage Movers move up and down in the X and Y directions. Click the links below to see a Model and Drawing of the little hero.

 

Carriage Mover

Model

Drawing

 

One major consideration that I didn’t want to overlook was what to do with the wires that ran from each stepper motor to the electrical boxes and cables that ran from the electrical boxes to the computer and power supplies. I decided to design two different types of “wire guides”. The first one, appropriately named the Wire Guide, was designed to mount underneath the Slider Bocks that the Y-Axis Motor Mount are mounted to. The next guide that I named the Wire Guide Pole was designed to simply be attached directly to each board. A standard steel coil is placed in the top hole and a set screw is placed in the side hole to keep the coil in place. This way a parallel port cable or a power cable can be wrapped in the coil so that if someone bumps into it the cable won’t fall on the track and also the cable can be removed without having to unplug anything. Below are the links to each Model and Drawing.

 

Assemble Wire Guide

Model

Drawing

Wire Guide

Model

Drawing

Wire Guide Mount

Model

Drawing

Wire Guide Pole

Model

Drawing

 

The final part that I designed was the cargo. The key element to the cargo was that an electromagnet had to be able to pick it up. Obviously steel is a ferrous material (magnetic), however steel is very heavy and I didn’t want to weigh the train down too much. I decided to make the cargo out of aluminum which is non-ferrous because it’s much lighter. Then I simply attached a piece of sheet metal to the top of the aluminum so that the electromagnet could pick it up. The sheet metal was attached by scratching the surfaces of both the sheet metal and the aluminum and then the two pieces were attached with super glue. The super glue works into the scratches and holds the two parts together. I chose to use the super glue because it’s incredibly strong and extremely lightweight. Below are links to the Cargo Models and Drawings.

 

Assembled Cargo

Model

Drawing

Non-Magnetic Cargo

Model

Drawing

Magnetic Cargo

Model

Drawing

 

All other parts for the Three Gantry System were designed by one of my teammates. If in the future he decides to post these parts on a web site I will eagerly create a link to that page.

 

Assignments and Challenges

 

Click on the links below to view what each Assignment and Challenge was. Below each link will be links to each Assignments or Challenges respective Models and Drawings.

 

Assignment One

 

Assembled Toy Truck

Model

Drawing

Body

Model

Drawing

Wheels

Model

Drawing

Axle

Model

--------

Horn

Model

Drawing

Bumper

Model

Drawing

 

 

Challenge One

 

Pillow Block

Model

Drawing

Base

Model

Drawing

Bearing

Model

Drawing

Rod

Model

--------

 

 

Assignment 2

 

Box

Model

Drawing

 

 

Assignments 3 & 5

 

Assembled Crusher

Model

Drawing

Body

Model

Drawing

Handle

Model

Drawing

Rod

Model

Drawing

Link

Model

Drawing

Original 50mm Pin

Model

Drawing

Revised 50mm Pin

Model

Drawing

Original Slider Block

Model

Drawing

First Revision Slider Block

Model

Drawing

Second Revision Slider Block

Model

Drawing

 

 

Challenge 2

 

Table

Model

Drawing

Base

Model

Drawing

Plate

Model

Drawing

Name Plate

Model

Drawing

 

 

Assignment 4

 

Box

Model

Drawing

Top

Model

--------

Bottom

Model

--------

 

 

Challenge 3

 

Shaft Support

Model

Drawing

Base

Model

Drawing

Fork

Model

Drawing

Sleeve

Model

Drawing

Post

Model

Drawing

 

 

Assignment 6

 

Smiley Face

Model

--------

Folder

Model

Drawing